The Child Who Refused to Be Comforted

Pastor Bill Johnson tells of a life-changing event in his own life when, after months of prayer to see miraculous healing in his church, he had an encounter with God. During this encounter, the power of the Holy Spirit came upon him. He felt God speak to him and ask, “Did you mean it when you said to me, ‘Lord, whatever it takes’?” Continue reading “The Child Who Refused to Be Comforted”

If I Am Forgiven, Why Do I Suffer?

In our ongoing review of Pastor Bill Johnson’s book God is Good: He is Better than You Think, we shall now turn to explore how God’s sovereignty plays out in the Christian life.

Can  a Christian Suffer?

We will begin our discussion today by asking an important question: If God has forgiven us completely of our sin at the Cross, is it possible for us to experience suffering? And if we can and do suffer, what does that mean about our relationship to God?

At first glance, it may not be clear how this question fits into our overall discussion. Recently, we discussed the folly of assuming that whatever happens to us is God’s will, especially situations involving hardship or calamity. At the same time, however, we have asserted with Johnson that God “is the Sovereign God [who] reigns over all” who is also “all-knowing and all-powerful,” and that “nothing is outside of His reach or His concern.”

But Johnson asks, “But is He in control?” This is a vital question. I would suggest we must accept the only logical conclusion to to this eternal truth: Yes, God is in control. If God is a sovereign God before whom nothing is outside of His reach or care — not even a sparrow that falls to the ground — then there is not one event on the Earth or in our lives that God not only allows but orchestrates. Strictly speaking, anything that happens to us is God’s will.

If God is a sovereign God before whom nothing is outside of His reach or care — not even a sparrow that falls to the ground — then there is not one event on the Earth or in our lives that God not only allows but orchestrates.

But we have pointed out that God, though Love itself, is not focused on ensuring that we experience His goodness, but rather that we choose it. This means our choices play a key role in our ability to experience all that God intends, and also leaves open the possibility that what we experience — though ordained by God — is not ultimately what He wanted for us.

The Case for Suffering

All of this makes sense. In fact, a God whose will for us is to choose the good may look very different from a God whose will for us is to simply make sure we experience the good. A God who is only focused on us experiencing good is confined to activity that will only bring about good things in our lives; the moment He does otherwise, He has violated His primary objective.

But a God who is focused on ensuring we choose what is good is not limited to such activity. If the goal is for us to choose the good, God may use any means to bring this about, even if they involve hardship and suffering.

A God who is only focused on us experiencing good is confined to activity that will only bring about good things in our lives; a God who is focused instead on us choosing the good is not limited to such activity.

This idea may sound familiar. In a previous post, we showed how the mere presence of suffering does not constitute abuse. Rather, it is always the motive behind it (and the motive alone) that does. At that time, the context of our discussion was to show that God’s sovereignty (and thus ultimate responsibility for human suffering) did not prove that He was evil. On the contrary, it demonstrated His holiness in His righteous judgment of mankind.

Here we are extending the discussion and applying it to the Christian life. We are saying that if the intention behind God’s will in our lives is not simply for us to experience good but rather to bring about our willingness to choose the good — in effect, to conform our will to the image of His Son — then even in the Christian life, God could use human suffering to bring about His ultimate aim without violating His goodness. For His motivation behind it is our ultimate good.

Love Requires Judgment?

In principle, Johnson agrees with this idea. In fact, he makes the case in his chapter Love Requires Judgment that all of God’s actions are motivated by love. A lot of Christians feel this way. And I would agree to a point, but I would suggest we cannot draw this line of reasoning too far.

It is difficult for example to explain how God, given the choice to pronounce judgment upon mankind or allow him to remain in the perfection of the Garden, acted in love by choosing the former. It is equally difficult to explain how God’s decision to send people to hell is an act of love. It is better to state that God’s holiness defines and upholds his spiritual laws concerning right and wrong and the consequence for violating his nature, but that this actions with mankind to conform us to these laws is done out of love.

It is difficult to explain how God, given the choice to pronounce judgment upon mankind or allow him to remain in the perfection of the Garden, acted in love by choosing the former. It is equally difficult to explain God’s decision to send mankind to hell as an act of love. This is one of the pitfalls of defining God as a God of love only, instead of the God we see in Scripture.

And that includes, or I may, would justifiably include, God orchestrating difficulty and hardship in the life of a believer. This does not necessarily call into question God’s goodness if God’s intention in it is the conforming of our will to His, and that His master plan is one that ultimately demands our cooperation. Depending on our own choices, we could just as easily find ourselves enjoying God’s goodness, or experiencing hardship that leads us to His goodness.

But — returning to our original question — if we have been forgiven by God of our sins, is it even possible for us to suffer? In other words, if all human suffering is caused by God’s judgment of sin, would that not suggest that we should now not experience any suffering, since we are completely forgiven?

The Case for the Faith-Based Church

This is not a mere academic question. In fact it represents the most notable difference between churches that identify themselves as “faith-based” and those that do not in today’s evangelical church culture. The evangelical church at large tends to emphasize what God’s forgiveness has accomplished for our eternal destiny (that is, where we go when we die). It has less to say about what God’s forgiveness has accomplished for us in the here and now.

This lack of emphasis on what to expect from God in this life explains why there is so much confusion about God’s sovereign will in the church today: Most have been taught we simply live in a fallen world where any calamity is possible, and there is not much God or we can do about it. It is not only a fatalistic world in which the worst tragedy that happens is God’s wish but also in many ways an atheistic world in which God is absent from — or at least not in control of — His own Creation.

Most have been taught that we simply live in a fallen world where any calamity is possible. It is not only a fatalistic world where the worst tragedy is God’s wish but also an atheistic world in which God is absent from — or at least not in control of — His own creation.

On the other hand, the faith-based church asserts that Jesus’ death on the Cross has not only secured our eternal destiny but also secured our freedom from all forms of human suffering. This helps to explain Johnson’s mission. Coming from the faith-based tradition, Johnson is primarily targeting the faulty notions about God in the evangelical church at large and seeks to awaken the church out of its unbelieving slumber to a higher opinion of God’s goodness — one that not only is willing to liberate us from all form of human suffering, but guarantees it.

For what it is worth, I find the faith-based position both provocative and persuasive. Through Jesus Christ, we simply do not see in Scripture a God who is unwilling to liberate mankind from any form of oppression. But this only makes the task at hand more difficult: If Jesus’ work on the Cross is so complete as to eliminate the possibility of human suffering, then God cannot use suffering and hardship to achieve a higher good, no matter how advantageous it might be. If He did, he would technically be allowing His children to come under the very judgment he has forgiven them of. He would be adding a “not quite” to Jesus’ declaration on the Cross, “It is finished.”

What is the Answer?

So what then is the answer? I believe it is found by returning to our story of the woman with cancer who refused prayer, and by asking a simple question: If the woman had persisted in her refusal to be prayed for, would God be obligated to heal here anyway?

Is God obligated to heal the woman in our story who refuses prayer? Upon this question rests our understanding of the entire Christian life.

Whether we realize it or not, upon this question rests not only our answer but also our understanding of the entire Christian life. Join me for our next discussion as we explore the case of the child who refuses to be comforted.

And in the meantime, feel free to leave a comment. I would love to hear from you!

God’s Sovereign Will: What Was God Thinking?

This is post 5 in our ongoing series reviewing pastor Bill Johnson’s book God Is Good: He is Better than You Think.

Pastor Bill Johnson tells a story about a woman he asked to pray for during a church service. She was suffering from cancer. Her reply was, “God has given me cancer to teach me patience.” To which Johnson replied, “If I treated my children that way, I would be arrested for child abuse.” The woman reconsidered, agreed to be prayed for and was healed. Continue reading “God’s Sovereign Will: What Was God Thinking?”